Set 23 Results


Author: Larry Cohen
Date of publish: 04/04/2017
Level: Intermediate to Advanced

Set 23 Results

For instructions, click here.
 

Board 1, West deals, Both Vulnerable

?K Q 8 7 4
?5 3
?K Q
?A Q 6 4
  ?J 10 9 3
?A 9 2
?A 10 2
?K 10 3

 

 

 

 


Scores for Board 1 :

6?:10
5?:5
3NT:2


After West's 1?, East should force to game. Yes, he has a 4-3-3-3 12-count, but the spots and prime cards make it worth a game force. So, assume 1?-2NT (Jacoby 2NT). Depending on the structure, West will make some sort of forward-going move, but East might not cooperate, having already forced to game. This is a tough one--slam is excellent since declarer's heart loser goes on the third diamond. Ironically, if East had the same HCP but a little more shape to the tune of 4=4=2=3, slam would have no play.

Board 2: East deals, Both Vulnerable

♠ K 3  
♥ A J 8 4  
♦ Q 3  
♣ K 10 9 8 2
 

♠ A 7 6  
♥ K Q 7 3  
♦ K J 5 4  
♣ A J
 

 

Scores for Board 2:

6?:10
5?:6
3N:3

After East's 1?, I like 2? GF with the West hand, but most would respond 1?. That would get raised to 3? and West is in slam zone. He might control-bid 3? and then East will bid 4?.  With optimism, eventually RKC will result in the decent heart slam. As to how to play it--that's not part of this feature. :)

 

Board 3, East deals, Both Vulnerable

?A Q J 4 2
?K
?Q J 6 5
?A K 3
  ?K 9 8 6
?A J 10 9 4
?2
?10 9 2

 

 

 

 


Scores for Board 3:
6?:10
5?:6
3N:2


Three slams in a row! West opens 1? (in 3rd seat) and now it is a question of methods. East could use Drury, or a mini-splinter (if available). I like to play passed-hand jumps as fit-showing, so 3? would be perfect.  If East bids only 2? (boo--bad evaluation), then West will not try for slam. Over anything else by East, West should show a sign of life and the good slam might be reached.

Board 4, West deals, Both Vulnerable

?A 2
?K 8 7
?A 10 8 7 6
?Q 5 4
  ?K 7 5 4
?A
?K Q J 9 4 2
?A J

 

 

 

 


Scores for Board 4:
7?:10
6NT:7
6?: 5
7NT: 4
5NT: 3
5?: 2


I hope you had your slam bidding shoes on this month. With 33 HCP, it is easy to reach 6, but what about the grand slam? How about this: 1?-1?-1NT-2? (artificial GF--see XYZ)-3? to start. Now, East knows his partner is likely 2=3=5=3 (from his 1NT rebid and subsequent 3?--not supporting spades.)  Now, if East can learn of the 2 keycards and one king, he can count 13 tricks in diamonds. Voila.
 

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